Boating Etiquette | Boating BC Association

BOATING ETIQUETTE

 

ALL BOATERS ARE PART OF THE SAME FAMILY. AND EVERY FAMILY HAS ITS TRADITIONS.

Being part of the boating community means knowing and following good etiquette; traditions that, over generations, have become the unwritten rules of the road. Just like being on land, we need to be good neighbours; help others when they need it, tidy up after ourselves and be respectful the people and environment around us.

Lend a Hand:

  • It doesn’t matter if you prefer power, sail or paddle - boaters help each other out. It could be as simple as offering to carry something on a dock, offering a seasoned word of advice or something more serious like placing a distress call for someone in trouble; it’s your job to look out for your fellow boaters.

Underway:

  • It goes without saying – you need to know and follow the rules of the road.
  • When overtaking a vessel, allow for as much room as possible and travel at a speed that won’t unnecessarily rock their boat.
  • Slow down when being overtaken.
  • If possible, overtake a vessel under sail well to leeward or pass astern in a crossing situation, so you don’t block their wind.
  • Watch your wake; think about the wash you create for people out fishing, kayaking, enjoying time on a moored boat – and even those on shore.
  • If you see someone in trouble, always stop to help.

At the Marina:

  • Don’t just moor anywhere - make sure your slip hasn’t been reserved by someone else.
  • Make sure you return carts, wheelbarrows and other shared marina equipment.
  • Tidy up your cords, equipment and personal items on the dock so they’re not hazards for someone else.
  • No swimming! There are a number of safety reasons not to swim in a marina unless, of course, it is a designated swimming area.
  • Offer to help others with their lines when docking.

Anchoring + Mooring:

  • Slow down when entering an anchorage or mooring area.
  • Select your anchorage carefully – giving yourselves and your new neighbours ample room. Remember winds change, anchors line tangle and hulls and dinghy’s can easily bang into each other. If you’re traveling with a lot of people and plan to be very social, you should anchor a little further away.
  • Be thoughtful at night; don’t run your generator around the clock, paddle rather than motor to shore and back and be conscious of your activity and noise levels.

At the Ramp + Fuel Dock:

  • Ramps and fuel docks are not a place to linger or socialize – wait your turn, do what you need to do and get out of the way!

Wherever you are: take your garbage home with you!

 

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